THE GUEST IS NOT ALWAYS RIGHT

Let’s pretend for a minute.  Let’s pretend that you are the manager of a luxury hotel and a couple comes to the front desk to check in.  And let’s pretend that the couple asks if you can have an ounce of cocaine brought to their room.  What are you going to do?  Don’t forget, this is a luxury Hotel we are talking about, and the guest is always right, right?  Of course you are going to say “No” Right?  I mean, come on?  cocaine is illegal and you wouldn’t do anything illegal even for a guest at a luxury hotel?  Right?

You see sometimes the guest (or client) is not right.  Ok the cocaine thing might be a bit extreme.  Let’s try again.  Take for example the allegations made by a waiter at the Ritz Carleton Hotel in Naples Fl.  Seems, according to the allegations in the LAWSUIT filed by the waiter, a British couple, upon checking into the hotel, informed the manager of the hotel that they did not want to be served by “people of color” (nice of them to be so politically correct, wouldn’t you say?) or “people with foreign accents.”  Seems that the hotel’s computer system has a record of the instructions.  Yes, someone entered into the Hotel’s computer system: “As per Mr. (the managing director Edward) Staros, this couple is very, very prejudice(d) and do like like [sic] ppl of color or foreign accents.”  Then, When Wadner Tranchant, a 15 year employee of the Hotel of Haitian decent tried to serve the family, he was “sent away.”  Mr. Tranchant, you may have guessed, is now suing the hotel.  What a shock!  By the way, if the facts are as he alleged, he is probably going to win.

So what should the Hotel (or more properly the Hotel Manager) have done?  He should have informed the guests that the Hotel would not honor their request.  He should have told them that his entire staff was extremely qualified and would provide the family with top quality service.  He should have told them that the Hotel would not discriminate against its employees or facilitate his prejudices.  And then, if the guest insisted or gave any of the employee’s even a bit of trouble, he should have asked the guests to leave.  You see, the guest is not always right.  You can see the USA Today story at http://content.usatoday.com/communities/ondeadline/post/2010/04/waiter-alleges-hotel-honored-british-couples-request-not-to-be-served-by-people-of-color/1